Fillies win for Muchea trainers

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Pearl Trade, who settled early in James Boag’s Premium Handicap (1200m) at Ascot on Saturday, beat her rivals home by about two and a half lengths. Picture: Anita McInnes

PEARL Trade showed she has a good turn of speed when she won the James Boag’s Premium Handicap (1200m) at Ascot on Saturday, February 3 for Muchea trainer Alan Mathews.

After the race jockey Patrick Carberry said he thought it was the first time she had settled in a race.

Carberry said while Pearl Trade went  well at home in previous races the three-year-old bay filly had wanted to go too hard, which had been frustrating.

“(But) I just kept saying to the owners and I know they were frustrated because we’ve told them how good she is when she does settle you’ll see the real horse that we’ve been telling you about,’’ he said.

“And today just proved it – she’s got a real good turn of foot when she does relax.’’

He said it was a credit to Mathews and his staff as they had changed a lot of things with the filly to get her right.

“Gear changes here and there and Alan’s changed her work at home and we’ve changed her work at the track.’’

He said she was a horse who needed to have cover and barrier one was not ideal but better than previous draws this preparation.

Mathews said there had been pace in the race and Pearl Trade had relaxed early.

“If she’d settle and race genuine she’d get 1400m to a mile,’’ he said.

“She’s just not a horse (that) you want to be putting your foot down on the accelerator.

“You just want to rider her quiet and let her get where she wants to be.’’

In the Penfolds Handicap (1600m) Friar Fox with jockey Shaun O’Donnell onboard came up trumps for trainer Justine Erkelens of Muchea.

Friar Fox won the Penfolds Handicap (1600m) for trainer Justine Erkelens of Muchea. Picture: Anita McInnes
Friar Fox won the Penfolds Handicap (1600m) for trainer Justine Erkelens of Muchea. Picture: Anita McInnes

Erkelens, whose stables are at Ascot, said an 1800m race was in future plans for the three-year-old filly.

O’Donnell said he thought she would make a stayer.

“She’s bred to stay,’’ he said.

“She ran the mile out easy there and just her demeanour and just her stride and action she should get a bit of ground.’’